Category Archives: Finance

Will you be penalised if you shop around

There is a view among many South African consumers that applying for a bond at more than one bank will have negative consequences. The belief is that these enquiries will impact on your credit score and therefore hurt your chances of getting a loan or push up its cost if you are successful.

Many people only apply at their own bank for just this reason. They think that they are taking a risk if they shop around.

This raises some obvious concerns. After all, you are only exercising your rights as a consumer to compare prices, so why should you be penalised for it?

Footprinting

What is a given is that every time you apply for a loan of any sort, this will be recorded on your credit profile. This is called footprinting, and credit providers may use this information to assess you.

“Credit providers consider a multitude of factors when vetting applications for credit, one of which would be demand for certain types of credit,” explains David Coleman, the head of analytics at Experian South Africa. “A sudden surge in demand for unsecured or short term credit, linked with signs of stress building on indebtedness and repayment capacity of the consumer, would result in the credit provider taking a more cautious approach in extending further credit to such a consumer.”

However, short term credit is not the same as long term credit like a home loan in this regard. In fact, Nedbank says that it views multiple applications for a bond made at the same time as a single enquiry.

The head of credit for FNB retail, Hannalie Crous explains that they also make a distinction:

“From an FNB perspective we do not look at number of bureau enquiries pertaining to home loans as a key determinant of a credit score,” she says. “The handful of credit bureau enquires associated with a bond application will have no effect, however  a consistent trend indicating that a consumer is taking on multiple loans could influence the outcome of a credit application.”

Not all bureaus will see you the same

In other words, the banks don’t see it as a negative if you shop around for a bond. A number of credit bureaus approached by Moneyweb also took the same line, although with a caveat:

“Each credit bureau and each credit provider that has their own in-house score will score consumers using their own criteria,” says Michelle Dickens, the MD of TPN. “It’s not a one size fits all. As a result there will be a higher weighting towards different aspects of data that will improve or decline the ultimate overall score.”

The head of the consumer bureau at XDS, Alex Moir, explains that different companies may therefore use information differently.

“Not all credit bureaus will use the application data in the credit scores, which means that a customer could go to as many banks as they like and their risk score with these bureaus would not be impacted,” he says. “Some credit bureaus do however use the application data and, in this instance, the consumer’s score could actually be impacted positively if they do enquiries at different banks. There is generally a threshold that some of the bureaus would have, where making one to three enquiries would add points to your score, three to five enquiries would leave the score as is and more than five could deduct points from your score.”

The importance of giving within your means.

This time of year sees both children and adults preparing their wish-lists for the upcoming festive season. But as many South Africans continue to grapple with rising debt, now is a good time to shift the focus from giving material items to providing future financial well-being.

Giving a child an investment as a gift will not only promote a culture of saving from a young age, but will also show them how you can make money grow.

There’s a powerful story of one customer’s commitment to leave a legacy for his family, and the value of sound financial advice. In November 1968, a customer made an initial deposit of  R400 into the Old Mutual Investors’ Fund and 48 years later, his investment is today worth over R600 000.

More precious than the value of his money, however, was the culture of saving and the legacy that he passed on to his children and grandchildren. On special occasions such as Christmas and birthdays, he invested a set amount of money on his children’s or grandchildren’s behalf. With this investment, his daughter was able to provide for her daughter’s schooling.

If South Africa is to develop a generation of financially savvy adults, it is crucial to not just talk about it, but actually practise good money habits. It is important to teach your children about money, and the festive season – with the spirit of giving – is a good time of the year for parents to set a good example. Teach your children about the importance of giving within your means, as well as showing them the value of relaxing with family and rewinding after a long, hard year, while respecting the value of hard-earned money.

Families should consider starting a financial tradition of their own. Set a reasonable budget for gift giving this festive season, and instead of spending all your money on gifts that are likely to fade, go missing or be forgotten, speak to your financial adviser about starting an investment in the name of your children.

When children become old enough to understand more about money management, parents should involve them in the process. Teach them the principle of compound interest and explain why putting money away today means they will have more money tomorrow. Help them set a budget for the money they’ll receive over the festive season, encouraging them to spend a smaller percentage today, and investing the rest for the future.

Here are various ways you can give a gift that keeps on giving long after the hype of the festive period has subsided:

Start saving for your children’s education: A hotly debated topic this year, the cost of education is something that needs to be saved towards and planned for. Opening an account and allocating money to it each month can help you fund your children’s future education.

Life-starter fund: Every parent dreams of having the power to provide their children with the necessities in life, but in reality, this isn’t always possible. Setting up an investment and adding to it each year, even just a small contribution of R500, will enable you to provide your children with a lump sum that they can use as a deposit for their first car or deposit on a house.

Set up a tax-free savings account for your children: A tax-free savings account can enable you to save towards your children’s long-term dreams and financial goals, but is also flexible enough to be accessed at any time should it be required. Also, by investing in a tax-free savings account, you won’t get taxed on the growth earned from the investment.

Find more ideas for save money this Christmas

Christmas may be the season of joy and goodwill, but it is also the season of spending. Often our enthusiasm for being festive outpaces our bank balances.

However, there are some simple ways to save some money without taking the enjoyment out of the season. Some of these may even make your Christmas even better.

Here are four simple ideas to curtail your Christmas budget:

Make your own crackers

Who isn’t tired of paying up for expensive crackers with the same gifts, the party hats that make you sweat, and the same lame jokes every year? (What’s Santa’s favourite pizza? One that’s deep pan, crisp and even.)

Making your own crackers might sound like an awful effort, but it can really be quite simple and extremely cost effective. A number of craft shops sell the cracker bodies that just need to be folded into shape, together with the ‘snaps’ that deliver the necessary bang when they are pulled. (You could download the template from the internet and cut some patterned cardboard or wrapping paper yourself, but this would be a lot more time consuming.)

Easy, cheap and always popular fillings, include luxury chocolate balls, mini soaps or lip gloss. Tiny bottles of whisky or liqueur also go down well, depending on the company.

Making Christmas crackers can also be a fun activity for your children to keep them busy for a few hours during the holidays. And that is priceless.

Make your own gifts

Depending on the size of your family, Christmas gift shopping can easily bite a big chunk out of your budget. It could also mean spending hours at crowded malls dodging speeding trolleys and cosmetics salespeople.

A far more relaxing and cost-effective option is to make gifts yourself, and it’s quite possible to do this tastefully. Baking biscuits and making jam are old favourites, but there are other options too.

You can make up your own mini hampers by ordering small hand-crafted pottery dishes online and filling them with personalised treats like artisanal chocolate and home-made confectionery. Wrap these up in cellophane and you have gifts that everyone will love.

Order your drinks online

Christmas almost demands good wine or even some top class South African brandy, and who doesn’t deserve a drink after a long year of hard work? But just popping down to your local off-license and filling a trolley is not always the best idea.

Firstly, you can’t be sure of getting the best prices, and secondly you’re likely to grab more than you really need just because it’s there and you’re in a festive mood.

Ordering drinks online can be a lot cheaper as you can looks for specials at the many local online stores available. You can also be unemotional about how much you actually need when the bottles aren’t staring you in the face.

Some shops also allow you to collect, which means there is no delivery fee. And that’s more money you can keep in your pocket.

Save for their kids school fees

With the start of 2017 looming, many parents may have started to consider the cost of their children’s school and tuition fees for the next school year. While families have a number of financial commitments to attend to every month, this is the time of year where school funds are often moved to the top priority to ensure that the family is financially prepared for the expenses that accompany a new school year.

Saving for a child’s education requires careful consideration and proper planning.

Here are some tips below for parents to ensure that they have planned appropriately for their children’s education costs:

Start early

Parents should start saving for their children’s education as soon as they possibly can. Many people do not consider, or are not aware of, the great advantages of compound interest, and how accumulated savings grow over several years when invested properly. By investing from an early age, parents will eliminate the financial worry of not having sufficient funds to give their children the best education possible, as the funds in their investment will grow every year.

Automate savings

The best way for parents to ensure they are regularly contributing towards their children’s education is to open a dedicated savings account and set up a monthly debit order. This way the parents will automatically save money every month towards this cause. However, they must have a strict rule in place to never withdraw any money from this account if it is not related to the child’s education.

Explore ways to get discounts

It is advisable to do some research and contact schools to find out whether they offer financial incentives that could result in long-term savings. Many schools offer a discount if the fees are paid as a once-off amount in advance. Some also offer a reduction when there is more than one child attending the school. These types of savings can make a big difference over an 18-year period.

Include education funding in the financial plan

It is important that parents include education funding in their overall financial plan. These expenses have to be accounted for as part of the monthly household expenses to determine how it will affect the family’s overall financial position. When it comes to developing financial plans, it is usually a good idea to consult a reputable financial planner who will be able to develop a solution for the client to ensure that they have provided sufficiently for their children’s tuition fees and related education expenses.

With the cost of education increasing every year, parents are faced with increased expenses for the privilege of sending their children to school. School fees are a big financial commitment, but with the right advice, families do not have to see this expense as a financial burden.

A financial kick in the pants

  • Prepare an itemised list of all your expenses and divide the expenses into Group A, being fixed expenses, such as car repayments, other debts and payments you are contractually bound to pay monthly. Other discretionary expenses you are able to reduce or even cancel without suffering any negative legal or financial consequences such as entertainment, clothing, cable TV should be included in a Group B.Select certain Group B expenses you wish to reduce or stop [that gym subscription?), do so and allocate extra payments to shorten the outstanding payment periods (and reduce the interest payable) of Group A expenses or start a small rainy day account for those unexpected financial surprises. Which expenses should be reduced and in what order of priority will depend upon circumstances such as interest rates, tax deductibility, outstanding payment periods and so on. Always a good idea to consult a professional to assist you in making the correct decision.
  • Make an appointment with your financial planner to verify whether your life, disability, dread disease and accident benefits are adequate or surplus to your needs and whether recent product developments have resulted in more cost efficient and/or comprehensive cover being available at the same or at a cheaper cost to you. Planners are, today, required to provide you with comprehensive comparative information to provide you with the peace of mind that you are making a decision that is in your best interest.
  • Create a filing system (whether it be a lever arch file or a folder on your desktop for emailed documentation) for all your financial records such bank or credit card statements, accounts and invoices. This will save an enormous amount of time when a payment is in dispute. If you have other important legal documents, why not also save these using a similar format?
  • Request your short term broker to review your insurance to ensure that your house, car and other property is sufficiently insured against damage or loss.
  • You will have, in all probability, already made a decision as to your medical aid plan for 2017. Speak to the medical aid consultant about so-called Gap cover to meet any possible shortfalls you may experience in the event of a medical emergency. These plans are relatively inexpensive and worth consideration.
  • Harass your banker for a better deal around your banking options. Is it really worth all those bank charges to have a Rolls Royce cheque account and credit card if you are not making use of all the benefits they offer? Consider a down grade of the banking package, at the risk of losing benefits you don’t use anyway but in so doing your bank charges may very well be substantially reduced.
  • Contact a credit bureau and request your free creditworthiness check, even the basic information provided by these reports can be an eye-opener. If there are there any adverse debt payment findings present on your profile, take steps to correct these by speaking to an attorney or the creditor responsible for the adverse record. Be particularly aware of possible instances of identity theft where your personal information and even identity number has been fraudulently used to obtain financing or credit facilities without your knowledge.
  • Assess your available credit facilities and, if necessary reduce the facility(ies) to a reasonable limit. For instance, having a credit facility to buy clothing for R50 000 may be flattering on your monthly statement but if you only regularly use R5 000 of the available amount the surplus R45 000 availability will negatively impact on the amount of any further credit you may apply for when wanting to purchase, say, a car or even a house!
  • Strategise your next vacation, it’s anticipated cost and save regularly in a separate investment such as a Money Market or Income fund type investment to fund the holiday. Your financial planner will be able to advise you as to appropriate investment options taking into account your personal circumstances, duration of the investment period, relevant amounts, costs and any risk that may be involved.
  • Consult with your tax advisor to identify any tax savings strategiesavailable to you. At the very least confirm that you are investing an adequate tax deductible amount in retirement annuity investments. A visit to your HR department to ascertain whether you can make an additional contribution to your pension or provident fund may also provide a tax efficient investment option.Take the information from your HR Department and your last tax assessment to your financial advisor and ask him to make proposals concerning your retirement annuity investment and/or any possible topping up of your pension or provident fund investment. Be very careful to assess the cash flow impact of any decision you make to increase contributions.

A simple calculation to do

In South Africa’s somewhat peculiar banking system, monthly charges for transactional accounts are a given. But is the few hundred rand you’re paying per month (if you’re lucky!) the best possible deal?

The first question you need to answer is whether you value having a ‘platinum’ or ‘private clients’ account with all the “value-adds” these offer?

Things like lounge access, bundled credit cards and a ‘personal’ banker are must-haves for some in the upper middle market. On the other end of the scale are basic, no-frills bank accounts (like Capitec’s Global One (and the clones from the other major banks)), but the truth is that most people need something a little more comprehensive than that. There’s likely a home loan, almost certainly vehicle finance and definitely a credit card.

So, do you need a ‘platinum’ (Premier/Prestige/Savvy Bundle)-type account? Do you actually use or need those value-adds? Or, do you enjoy the ‘status’ of having a platinum or black credit card? (Here, emotion – and ego – comes into the equation….)

This is an important question to answer, because the difference in bank charges between a more vanilla bundle account and ‘platinum’ is easily 50%!

While banks try to shoehorn you into product categories based on your salary or profession, there’s nothing stopping you from moving to another product (or refusing those ‘upgrades’). From a personal perspective, the only reason I have an FNB Premier (i.e. platinum) account (not gold) is because I do actually make use of the ‘free’, albeit diminishing, Slow Lounge access. And, the eBucks rewards I earn on this account are the most lucrative of the lot, based on the products I use, my transaction habits and spending patterns. (‘Upgrading’ to Private Clients is a mugs game because the thresholds for ‘earning’ rewards are significantly higher, to match one’s status and earnings, of course!)

Once you’ve answered this question – which is more important than most people realise – the next step is to figure out whether a bundled account or pay-as-you-transact one makes the most sense. Most of us enjoy not having to ‘worry’, so we readily sign up for the all-in-one package without actually understanding the differences in pricing.

For the purposes of this exercise, FNB pricing will be used (as its most relevant to me). But, the overall price structures (bundled vs unbundled) are roughly the same for the four full-service banks, and links to the most recent pricing for the various banks are available here:

  • FNB (July 2016 to June 2017)… Moneyweb analysis here
  • Absa (from January 2017)… Moneyweb analysis here
  • Nedbank (from January 2017)… Moneyweb analysis here
  • Standard Bank (from January 2017)… Moneyweb analysis here

Now, figure out what an average month of transactions on your cheque account looks like. For most, this won’t change meaningfully month-to-month. There’ll be some debit orders (internal and external), electronic account payments, inter-account transfers (e.g. settling your credit card or moving money to a savings account), and perhaps some withdrawals from an ATM. It isn’t too useful to look at one month in isolation as there may be atypical transactions that distort the picture.

Available to avoid sale of assets

The death of a spouse, friend or relative is often an emotional time even before estate matters are addressed.

And truth be told, death can be an expensive and cumbersome affair, particularly if estate planning was neglected, the claims against the estate start accumulating and there isn’t sufficient cash to settle outstanding debts.

People generally underestimate the costs related to death, says Ronel Williams, chairperson of the Fiduciary Institute of Southern African (Fisa). Most individuals have a fairly good grasp of significant expenses like a mortgage bond that would have to be settled, but the smaller fees can also add up.

To avoid a situation where valuable assets have to be sold to settle outstanding debts, it is important to do proper planning and take out life and/or bond insurance to ensure sufficient cash is available, she notes.

Costs

The costs involved in an estate can broadly be classified as administration costs and claims against the estate. The administration costs are incurred after death as a result of the death. Claims against the estate are those the deceased was liable for at the time of death, the notable exception being tax, Williams explains.

Administration costs as well as most claims against the estate will generally need to be paid in cash, although there are exceptions, for example the bond on the property. If the bank that holds the bond is satisfied and the heir to the property agrees to it, the bank may replace the heir as the new debtor.

Williams says quite often estates are solvent, but there is insufficient cash to settle administration costs and claims against the estate. In the event of a cash shortfall the executor will approach the heirs to the balance of the estate to see if they would be willing to pay the required cash into the estate to avoid the sale of assets.

If the heirs are not willing to do this, the executor may have no choice but to sell estate assets to raise the necessary cash.

“This is far from ideal as the executor may be forced to sell a valuable asset to generate a small amount of cash.”

If there is a bond on the property and not sufficient cash in the estate, it is not a good idea to leave the property to someone specific as the costs of the estate would have to be settled from the residue. Where a particular item is bequeathed to a beneficiary, the person would normally receive it free from any liabilities. This could result in a situation where the beneficiaries of the residue of the estate may be asked to pay cash into the estate even though they wouldn’t receive any benefit from the property, Williams says.

The most significant administration costs are generally the executor’s and conveyancing fees.

If the will does not explicitly specify the executor’s remuneration, it will be calculated according to a prescribed tariff, currently 3.5% of the gross value of the assets subject to a minimum remuneration of R350. The executor is also entitled to a fee on all income earned after the date of death, currently 6%. If the executor is a VAT vendor, another 14% must be added.

Assuming an estate value of R2 million comprising of a fixed property of R1 million, shares, furniture, vehicles and cash, the executor’s fee at a tariff of 3.5% would amount to R70 000 (plus VAT if the executor is a VAT vendor). Conveyancing fees will be an estimated R18 000 plus VAT. Depending on the situation, funeral costs may be another R20 000, while other fees (Master’s Office fees, advertising costs, mortgage bond cancellation and tax fees) can easily add another R10 000. By law advertisements have to be placed in a local newspaper and the Government Gazette, with estimated costs of between R400 and R700 and R40 respectively. Master’s fees are payable to the South African Revenue Service (Sars) in all estates where an executor is appointed with a gross value of R15 000 or more. The maximum fee is R600.

Where applicable mortgage bond cancellation costs, appraisement costs, costs of realisation of assets, transfer costs of fixed property or shares, bank charges, maintenance of assets and tax fees will also have to be paid. The executor is also allowed to claim an amount for postage and sundry costs, while funeral expenses, short-term insurance, maintenance of assets and the cost of a duplicate motor vehicle registration certificate may also have to be taken into account.

How government is collecting more tax revenues by stealth

Over the last few years government has collected a significant amount of tax revenue by not fully adjusting the personal income tax tables for inflationary increases in earnings, thereby increasing the effective tax rate of individuals.

A middle-class individual earning a taxable income of R400 000 per annum in the 2016 year of assessment, would have seen her after-tax income increase by only 5.42% and 5.05% in the 2017 and 2018 tax years respectively, even if her taxable income increased by 6% every year.

During his most recent budget speech, finance minister Pravin Gordhan collected more than R12 billion of the R28 billion in additional taxes he needed from the personal income tax system in this way.

In a similar fashion, taxpayers may now become liable for capital gains tax (CGT) purely because three of the exclusions have not been adjusted for the effects of inflation since March 1 2012.

1. The primary residence exclusion

When taxpayers sell their primary residence and realise a capital gain on the transaction, an exclusion of R2 million applies.

Louis van Vuren, CEO of the Fiduciary Institute of Southern Africa (Fisa), says if the exclusion was adjusted for inflation over the past five years, it would have increased to around R2.6 million over the period.

For someone who bought an upper middle-class house in Cape Town for R650 000 in 2002 and who wants to sell it now, this has significant implications.

Van Vuren says today the house would be worth roughly R3 million. If it were sold, the capital gain realised would amount to R2.35 million (assuming no capital improvements and a base cost of R650 000). Due to the primary residence exclusion, R2 million would be disregarded, and 40% (the inclusion rate for individuals) of the capital gain of R310 000 (after deduction of the R40 000 annual exclusion) would have to be included in the individual’s taxable income.

At an assumed marginal income tax rate of 41%, the individual would have to pay R50 840 in CGT, purely because the primary residence exclusion hasn’t been adapted for inflation, he adds.

2. The year of death exclusion

Apart from the primary residence exclusion, the South African Revenue Service allows for a capital gain exclusion of R300 000 on all other assets in the year of an individual’s death (instead of the normal R40 000 annual exclusion). Personal use assets like artwork, jewellery and vehicles do not attract capital gains tax.

Van Vuren says if someone had invested R250 000 on the JSE in March 2009 in the wake of the financial crisis and it kept track with the performance of the All Share Index, the investment would have grown to roughly R700 000.

Since the individual would be deemed to have disposed of the investment upon death, the capital gain would amount to R450 000, which would reduce to R150 000 after the R300 000 exclusion had been deducted.

Van Vuren says if the exclusion kept track with inflation it would have been around R400 000 today and the gain would be only R50 000 (R700 000 minus R250 000 minus R400 000).

At an inclusion rate of 40%, the R100 000 “additional gain” that had been realised will add R40 000 to the individual’s taxable income, which, at a marginal tax rate of 41% would lead to R16 400 in CGT, purely due to inflation.

Derail your will and estate plan

INGÉ LAMPRECHT: People often draft a will with the best intentions, and even though the document may be technically sound, emotional decisions can have far-reaching consequences for the beneficiaries. They may even result in potential delays when winding up the estate.

To discuss the feelings or sentiments that could derail your estate planning, I’m joined by the CEO of the Fiduciary Institute of Southern Africa, Louis van Vuren. Louis, I’d like to discuss each of these emotions in some detail, but let’s unpack the issues first. What has been your experience? What are the five emotional issues that may create problems when winding up an estate?

LOUIS VAN VUREN: Ingé, firstly the desire to control – even after your death. Then also the desire to keep the peace – specifically in difficult family circumstances. Then there is also sympathy with struggling children, trying to look after your struggling children after your death, sometimes at the expense of other considerations. Feelings of guilt, or what I sometimes call debts of honour, when people feel they want to set the record straight or set things right in the will that they haven’t got round to during their lifetime. And then lastly feelings of superiority, whether it’s moral superiority or racial superiority or whatever. That also sometimes comes between a good, practical legally enforceable will and the wishes of the testator.

INGÉ LAMPRECHT: Louis, like you mentioned just now, impractical provisions in a will are often due to a desire to control or rule from the grave, so to speak. Why is this problematic and how do you avoid it?

LOUIS VAN VUREN: Ingé, the reality is that it doesn’t matter how carefully you think about things prior to your death, after your death circumstances can change drastically. And then if your will and the provisions of your will and how you would like things to happen after your death – sometimes for many years to come in certain cases – do not take into consideration the fact that circumstances can change drastically, this can lead to impractical situations, impractical solutions, etc.

One example would be: it has been, especially in the farming community, for many years customary to leave the farm and the farming operations to, let’s say, a son with the usufruct in favour of the surviving spouse, usually the wife. And the usufruct – in itself there is nothing wrong with it and it’s a perfectly legal structure – but the practical side of this is that often the farmers also try to limit the usufruct by stipulating that it will exist until the death or remarriage of the surviving spouse. And when people started living together and not necessarily getting married, there were all kinds of hilarious ways of trying to avoid a situation where the surviving spouse would still enjoy the usufruct after living with somebody.

An example that I came across many years ago was where the will stipulated that if the surviving spouse, the wife, stayed with any man under the roof of that farmhouse for more than five nights, the usufruct would be cancelled and everything would then go to the son. Now obviously the surviving spouse then found a very creative way around that. She married a year-long friend of theirs and they stayed in the house on the farm from Monday to Saturday morning, then went to town for the weekend and came back on the next Monday morning.

Easier for those allergic to forms

The introduction of the smart phone a decade ago has changed many things. It’s changed the way you find things in the dark; it’s changed the way you wake up; it’s changed the way you communicate; it may even have changed the amount of time you spend in the loo. What it hasn’t changed, however, is investing.

Opening a new investment remains a complex forms-based process, requiring among other things multiple ID verification. “It’s not hard to see why young people don’t invest,” says Juan Labuschagne, an actuary with long-term insurer Liberty and head of development at Stash. “Look at these forms – they are a barrier – and that’s before you start selecting from one of 50 unit trust options.”

What if you could pay for your cappuccino using a credit, debit or cheque card and automatically the balance – rounded up to the nearest R10, R20 or R50 – was invested in the JSE’s top 100 companies?

Liberty has developed an app, called Stash – as in stash your cash – that enables savers to do exactly that.

Users decide how much they want to stash. The app rounds up the amount of every transaction. If a user decides that their Stash limit per transaction is R10 and they make a transaction for R45, this would be rounded up to R50. The R5 in change is stashed.

Labuschagne explains, “All this spare change accumulates without interfering with your day-to-day life. Stash checks your daily bank balance and never transfers more than you can afford, so you don’t have to worry about going into overdraft. Before you know it you’ll have a significant Stash balance. Your Stash grows as fast as South Africa’s biggest companies do because your spare change is invested in South Africa’s top 100 listed companies.”

There are several funky features to this product. The first is that users are automatically invested in a tax-free savings account. The second is that the app takes less than a minute to download and activate and third, there are no fees on the investment. None.

“We have designed it to encourage people – particularly first-time savers – to invest,” says Labuschagne. “The irony of tax-free savings accounts is that only 21% of the tax-free accounts opened to date have been opened by first-time savers.”

The reason the Stash sign-on process is so fast is because the verification process has been simplified. All that is required is your name, ID and cellphone number – and this information is transferred via the smart phone. And your bank card (not account) details – which are not stored by Stash, but by a Standard Bank subsidiary (which also manages encryption for Snapscan). These are also transferred via the phone.

So what is not required is complex scanning and sending of documents required by most financial institutions in the name of Fica.